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Crib Talk

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Does your child talk to herself when she's alone in bed? Her monologues may help her make sense of her day. At least, that's the theory from Katherine Nelson, a psychologist at the City University of New York. Nelson and her colleagues studied "crib talk" and found it to be very rich. Their evidence shows that small children who chatter to themselves are re-creating their world by retelling and interpreting key experiences, such as being left at day care or meeting a new pet. By talking these experiences over, your child finds meaning in them and this, in turn, enhances her developing sense of self.

These special musings are part of your child's growing emotional and cognitive skills. So listen to what she has to say without interrupting. Don't be surprised if you hear your own scolding voice or an imitation of your comfort talk. She's going over everything that happened to her, which naturally includes what goes on in your family.


 
 
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Mason
My son Mason talks to himself every time we put him down for a nap. Sometimes he talks to the show h..

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