skip to navigation
Pampers® Village a place to grow

Finger Play for Young Children

0   people commented
on this article
 
9
 
0
Location: Indoor
Promotes: Fun & Games
How to play

How it Plays

"Where Is Thumbkin?" (to the tune of "Frère Jacques")


Where is Thumbkin? (hide hands behind back)


Where is Thumbkin?


Here I am, here I am! (bring hands to front with thumbs up)


How are you today, friend? (wiggle thumb)


Very well, I thank you.


Run away, run away. (hide hands behind back)


You can repeat the verse using other fingers: Pointer (index finger), Tall Man/Woman (middle finger), Ring Man/Woman (ring finger), Baby (little finger), and then the whole family (all the fingers).


(Traditional, Great Britain, North America)


This classic finger game is a wonderful way to enhance your child's fine motor development and eye-hand coordination. As your child isolates, identifies, and manipulates each of his fingers, from Thumbkin to Baby, he is becomes more adept at controlling them.


"The Wheels on the Bus"


The wheels on the bus go round and round, (rotate fists around each other)


Round and round, round and round.


The wheels on the bus go round and round


All through the town.


The people on the bus go up and down, (bounce up and down)


Up and down, up and down.


The people on the bus go up and down,


All through the town.


The door on the bus goes open and shut, (hands out to side and then clap shut)


Open and shut, open and shut.


The door on the bus goes open and shut


All through the town.


The money on the bus goes clink, clink, clink, (pretend to drop coins in coin box)


Clink, clink, clink, clink, clink, clink.


The money on the bus goes clink, clink, clink,


All through the town.


The driver on the bus says, "Move on back!" (use thumb to signal to the back)


"Move on back!" "Move on back!"


The driver on the bus says, "Move on back!"


All through the town.


The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep (pretend to honk using fist of one hand and palm of other)


Beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep.


The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep,


All through the town.


The baby on the bus goes, "Waa, waa, waa," (rub eyes with hands)


"Waa, waa, waa," "Waa, waa, waa."


The baby on the bus goes, "Waa, waa, waa,"


All through the town.


The Mommy on the bus goes, "Shh-shh-shh" (put forefinger to mouth)


"Shh-shh-shh," "Shh-shh-shh,"


The Mommy on the bus goes, "Shh-shh-shh"


All through the town.


The Daddy on the bus goes, "I love you!" (sign language: point to self, cross heart, point to child)


"I love you!" "I love you!"


The Daddy on the bus goes, "I love you!"


All through the town.


(Traditional, Great Britain, United States)


Join your child on a bus ride "all through the town." This hugely popular song combines your child's love of pretending with a busload of actions and sound effects. It's a great accompaniment to long car trips.


"The Eensy, Weensy Spider"


The eensy, weensy spider (make climbing motion, alternating index finger and thumb of opposite hands)


Climbed up the water spout.


Down came the rain (make raindrops falling down)


And washed the spider out. (push hands to side)


Out came the sun (hands make a circle over head)


And dried up all the rain. (with palms in front, wave side to side in drying motion)


And the eensy, weensy spider


Climbed up the spout again. (repeat climbing motion)


(Traditional, Great Britain, North America)


The saga of this little spider will delight your child, especially on rainy days. You can add a verse about "the great big hairy spider" or whatever else will fit the rhythm. Just change the pitch of your voice, the amount of rainfall, and the size of the sun accordingly.


"If You're Happy and You Know It"


If you're happy and you know it clap your hands. (clap, clap)


If you're happy and you know it clap your hands. (clap, clap)


If you're happy and you know it


Then your face will surely show it. (smile)


If you're happy and you know it clap your hands. (clap, clap)


If you're sad and you know it you can cry. ("boo hoo")


If you're sad and you know it you can cry. ("boo hoo")


If you're sad and you know it


Then your face will surely show it. (look sad)


If you're sad and you know it you can cry. ("boo hoo")


You can repeat the verses with substitutions like these:


If you're angry and you know it stomp your feet. (stomp feet)


If you're tired and you know it go to sleep. (snore or hold both hands to side of head)


If you're silly and you know it wiggle all over. (wriggle)


If you're hungry and you know it you can eat. (pretend to eat)


(Traditional, Great Britain, North America)


At this stage in their lives, young children are starting to learn about feelings. This song lets them pretend to be happy, sad, angry, sleepy, or silly in a supportive setting.


Learning and Growing

Young children benefit from songs that challenge them to learn new words, coordinate their movements, and keep the rhythm and the beat. Most important, songs encourage children to express their emotions in a safe, accepting environment.


Learning and Growing
What you'll need
 
 
0

Member comments

You might also like

A soft and strong wipe for a refreshing clean

Find out about Pampers® Baby Fresh Wipes
Pampers® Baby Fresh Wipes