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You might have noticed some unusual changes and started to wonder: Could I be… pregnant!?

Or you might not observe any early signs of pregnancy except that your period is late. Either way, you can take a home pregnancy test that will confirm your pregnancy, and then visit your healthcare provider for a medical checkup and to schedule the rest of your prenatal appointments.

Common Pregnancy Symptoms at One Month Pregnant

Early signs of pregnancy at one month pregnant aren’t necessarily the most noticeable; however, they can include:

  • Mood changes
  • Bloating
  • Cramps
  • Lower backache
  • Spotting
  • Frequent urination
  • Sore or tender breasts
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Constipation
  • Food cravings and aversions
  • Missed period

Keep in mind that at one month pregnant, you may not experience most or any of these changes or conditions. Instead, you might first suspect you could be pregnant when you notice your period is late, and then that you’ve missed your period altogether.

One Month Pregnant: Changes Inside and Out

Embryonic Development: After conception, the fertilized egg will travel from the fallopian tube to the womb and will implant in the uterus lining. The egg divides into a bunch of cells, becoming an embryo. At about week eight, the embryo has developed a tiny spine and limbs, and has started to grow the brain, eyes, and ears.

Changes to Your Body: When you find out you're pregnant, you might react in different ways than you expected. Your feelings might even change from one moment to the next. These emotional shifts, caused in part by pregnancy hormones, are totally normal. Allow yourself the time to rest and process your feelings. Aside from the early pregnancy symptoms described above, you might not notice too many other physical changes.

Diet and Exercise in the Third Month of Pregnancy

Many women start to notice that their morning sickness subsides, and they feel a surge of energy. Take advantage of this energy boost by starting or continuing a healthy pregnancy exercise plan. If you're an exercise newbie, check in with your healthcare provider first, but exercises like prenatal yoga and swimming could be good, safe options.

It’s as important as ever to focus on a nutritious pregnancy diet, including regular, small meals of protein, vegetables, fruit, and whole grains. Stay hydrated with water, and stick to a maximum of 200 milligrams of caffeine per day.

Your healthcare provider can give you personalized dietary advice, but pregnant women should avoid fish with high levels of mercury, as well as alcohol, unpasteurized cheese and milk, processed meats, and raw eggs. Be sure to thoroughly rinse fruits and vegetables under running water before eating or preparing them.

First Month of Pregnancy Quick List

Find out if you’re pregnant: You can find out you’re pregnant by taking a home pregnancy test. These tests are usually more accurate when taken a few days or even a week after the first day of your missed period.

Get a doctor’s checkup: Head to your healthcare provider, who’ll be able to confirm your pregnancy via tests, including measuring your levels of the hormone known as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Your provider will also be able to give you guidance on the appointments you’ll need to keep over the next nine months (or so).

Pregnancy nutrition: Speak to your doctor about healthy pregnancy nutrition and what pregnancy vitamins or supplements might be right for you.

Refocus on your health: Try to quit unhealthy habits like smoking and drinking, and try to reduce stress.

Check in with your feelings: This is an emotional time, and you might be feeling all kinds of physical symptoms and pregnancy emotions. Rest up, and speak to loved ones about how you are feeling.

First Month of Pregnancy Quick List

Find out if you’re pregnant: You can find out you’re pregnant by taking a home pregnancy test. These tests are usually more accurate when taken a few days or even a week after the first day of your missed period.

Get a doctor’s checkup: Head to your healthcare provider, who’ll be able to confirm your pregnancy via tests, including measuring your levels of the hormone known as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Your provider will also be able to give you guidance on the appointments you’ll need to keep over the next nine months (or so).

Pregnancy nutrition: Speak to your doctor about healthy pregnancy nutrition and what pregnancy vitamins or supplements might be right for you.

Refocus on your health: Try to quit unhealthy habits like smoking and drinking, and try to reduce stress.

Check in with your feelings: This is an emotional time, and you might be feeling all kinds of physical symptoms and pregnancy emotions. Rest up, and speak to loved ones about how you are feeling.

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